0

Princesa iraní qajair.

The beauty is a personal thing. And what’s the beauty nowadays when people go under knives to be (more) beautiful and (more) attractive? Is it familiar to you when someone says that you are as beautiful as a princess? But have you ever seen a princess with a moustache? All aboard, here comes the beauty with moustache. This isn’t a joke. Scroll down and you’ll see!

Anis al- (sitting)

Anis l-Doleh was the most eligible princess in the 19th-century, and despite not having a head turning beauty, she managed to make hundreds of men begging her marry them thanks to her brilliant mind (she was filthy rich as well).

She was so desirable that some men even committed suicide after being rejected

This is, joking aside, a woman and a princess who was certainly not considered ugly. She might even have been considered a beauty.

Even though she was not charming at all, her family was wealthy and she was blonde. The property of her family was enormous, but besides, the princess was one of the few educated women of the time in Iraq.

Anis al-Doleh or soulmate of State

She was so smart and capable that her family asked her advice on matters of governance and management from an early age.

She had a special ability in diplomacy, because her way of expression and her ability to resolve disputes in a peaceful manner prevented many conflicts.

Her wealth and intelligence were, therefore, the two most important features that made her so irresistible.

The story even states that when Anis l-Doleh was at the age of marriage she had marriage proposals from at least 150 amorous suitors of high nobilityfrom the surrounding kingdoms, while 13 of them committed suicide because of her refusal to marry them.

Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar

In the end, the chosen lover and husband was the Persian king Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar. He ruled over Iran for 47 years, and he ruled over his wives, 84 wives to be more precise.

Ad-Din Shah Qajar and the photographer Sevryugin before a photoshoot.

Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar and his beloved wife Anis al-Doleh

Nasser al-Din Shah himself printed the photos in the palace laboratory and kept in satin albums in his Golestan Palace, which now is the museum.

On the right, Anis al-Doleh, Naser’s wife

Part of King Naser’s harem at the picnic.

Anis was his most important and a queen wife, so she had the lead over the rest.

The king Shah Naser al-Din Shah Qajar, was a powerful macho man in 1948, the fourth most powerful man at that time. His kingdom was the longest in the history of Iran.

Let’s talk a little bit of the female beauty in the Qajar period. I’ll give you few words: thickness in double meaning, thick in eyebrows and chubby. Oh, I mean in an eyebrow, in a unibrow. Hey, one love, one brow. Then, moustache. Thin and shaved, no thanks!

When a foreign merchant asked Nasser why the big sized women were considered beautiful, the king just replied: “When you go to the butchers, do you buy bones or meat?” I am sure you won’t disagree with that.

Part of King Naser’s harem wearing ballet tutus

Maybe the most bizarre fact is that all his wives were wearing tutus. They were copies of Russians ballet dancers who fascinated the king. Speaking of the natural look, they left the legs unshaved. The reason for wearing tutu was the mark “not handsome enough.”

Young concubine with a hookah.

If beauty is in the eye of the beholder then Shah was totally blind.

Khanum Ismat al-Dawlah daughter of Nasir al-Din Shah. Part of the collection of the Institute for Iranian Contemporary Historical Studies (ع 3-5216).

via: cloudmind

15 real photos of Iranian shah and his harem, which was almost 100 women

Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar – Shah of Iran

Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar and his beloved wife Anis al-Doleh.

A few days ago the news spread around the world: North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has revived the tradition of his grandfather and father and started a personal harem «Garden of Delights». Harem for europeans seems sort of abode young and beautiful women from the famous Arabian Nights «1000 and One Nights.» Meanwhile, a curious pictures of the harem of Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar, who ruled in Iran in the late 19th century, are changing stereotypes of old beauty standards. In our review you can see the beauties of the harem of the Iranian shah.

Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar – Shah of Iran was the fourth power in 1848 and ruled for 47 years. His reign was the longest in the 3000-year history of Iran.


Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar

Historians tell about Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar, that in his time Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar was very well educated and had the reputation of a sybarite, what later made angry people surrounding him.


Al-Din Shah Qajar and photographer Sevryugin before photoshoot.

One of the many passions of Shah Qajar was a photography. In childhood he liked to take pictures, and when he came to power, decided to establish in his palace the first official photo studio. In the 1870s in Tehran russian photographer Anton Sevryugin opened his photo-atelier , Anton Sevryugin became court photographer of Iranian ruler. Sevryugin created a chronicle of Iran and for his services was awarded the honorary title.


The main entrance to the palace of Gulistan.

Russian photographer could shoot only Shah, his male relatives, courtiers and servants. And for a Qajar, an ardent fan of the photo,shah left the right to take photos of his harem, in which according to the testimony of historians there were about 100 concubines.


Completeness of the body – as the main criterion of beauty.

It is known that Nasser al-Din Shah himself printed the photos in the palace laboratory and kept in satin albums in his Golestan Palace, which now is the museum.


Incomparable Anis al-Doleh – beloved wife of the Shah (right).

Extraordinariness of photos of his concubines is that Shiite law at that time was not permissible to shoot the faces of people, and especially faces of women. And only the most powerful man in the country could afford to break the law.


Anis al-Doleh or soulmate of State.

Looking at the photos of the ladies of the harem, you feel that they look quite modern for their time , as women behave steadily calm in front of the camera.


Incomparable Anis al- (sitting)

Photos of women challenged the conventional view of life in the harem – the wives of shah look quite modern for its time and self-confident, they quietly look into the camera lens and not shy.

Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar with some women of the harem.

You can even suggest that women in the harem had friendly relations – some photos show the group on a picnic.

Harem at the picnic.

The harem inmates did not suffer of thinness.

By the photos can be seen the taste of the Iranian monarch – all women are complete , with fused bushy eyebrows and clearly visible mustache . It is clearly seen that women do not suffer from hunger and are not burdened with physical work.

Young concubine with a hookah.

On many photos concubines depicted in short skirts like a lush ballet tutus (shaliteh). And it is no coincidence.

The ladies of the harem in ballet tutus.

The ladies of the harem in ballet tutus.

It is known that in 1873, Nasser al-Din Shah, at the invitation of Alexander II visited St. Petersburg and attended the ballet. According to legend, he was fascinated by the Russian dancers ,so he introduced the ballet tutu to his harem. However, it is possible that this is just a legend.

Article translated from www.kulturologia.ru

Vintage Photos of The Iranian Shah and His 84 Wives

1800s | January 20, 2017

In 1842, Queen Victoria of England handed out a present to a then 11 year-old Shah Qajar of Persia– a camera. The heir to the Persian throne fell in love with this magical contraption and photography became one of his many passions. When he took over the throne, he organized the world’s first official photo studio at his court. In the next few years, he documented his life, exposing to the public eye things it was never supposed to see.

Naser al-Din Shah Qajar

Russian photographer Anton Sevryugin started a workshop in Tehran during 1870s. Sevryugin was the official photographer to the Persian court who created a photographic record of Persia, and was awarded an imperial title for his works.

Naser Al-Din Shah Qajar and the photographer Sevryugin before a photoshoot

Anton Sevryugin was allowed to take pictures of the Shah himself and all his male relatives, courtesans and servants. However, the right to photograph the harem was exclusive for Qajar himself. Historians believe the Shah had approximately 100 concubines.

It is regarded that Naser al-Din Shah produce the pictures in a darkroom at the court and preserve them in large albums in the Golestan palace, which is a museum today.

Below: The main entrance to the palace of Gulistan.

The reason these photographs are considered remarkable, is that Shiia custom of the time, photography of peoples’ faces, especially those of women, are prohibited. And only the most powerful man in the country could break this tradition.

Below: The exceptional Anis al-Doleh was the Shah’s favourite wife. (On the right)

Plumpness was one of the primary criteria of beauty.

Young concubine with a hookah.

These pictures of women contradict the conventional image of life in a harem.

The Shah’s wives appears to be up to date for their time, and they stare calmly into the lens, without coquettishness or slavery.

Below: Anis al-Doleh, known as the Shah’s soulmate.

The incomparable Anis al-Doleh (sitting).

Below: The harem at a picnic.

Naser al-Din Shah Qajar with few of his wives.

Naser al-Din Shah Qajar with some of his wives.

The wives of the Shah didn’t suffer from skinniness.

You can deduce the Iranian monarch’s tastes from the photos. It’s apparent that the women didn’t suffer from emaciation and were not encumbered with physical work. Experts claim that the alleged nude photos in the Golestan collection have been well hidden.

Below: Ladies from the harem in ‘shaliteh’ skirts.

Several photos will show the concubines in short, opulently designed skirts called ‘shaliteh’, identical to ballet tutus. Accordingly, it is no coincidence.

In 1873, on the invitation of Russian Tsar Alexander II, Naser al-Din visited Saint Petersburg . Subsequently, he visited the ballet and was supposedly charmed by the Russian dancers; that is why his women dressed in similar skirts. Naturally, the concubines only clear away their Muslim dress for the camera. Yet again, this may be just hearsay.

Below: Ladies from the harem in ‘shaliteh’ skirts.

H/T Bright Side

Tags: iranian shah harem | Naser al-Din Shah Qajar and His 84 Wives

La princesa de Qajair, un viral entre el mito y la realidad

El triunfo de las leyendas urbanas no es otro que el de utilizar un hecho real y maquillarlo hasta hacerlo atractivo, algo que ha pasado con uno de los últimos fenómenos virales que navegan a gran velocidad por Facebook. Las imágenes de la supuesta Princesa iraní Qajair recorren la red social por diferentes páginas de curiosidades que no dejan de compartir un post que se mueve entre el mito y la realidad.

«Tuvo 145 pretendientes de la alta nobleza y 13 de ellos se quitaron la vida por su rechazo», explican dichos perfiles sobre Qajair, de la que explican que «se consideraba el símbolo de la perfección y la belleza». Junto al texto aparecen dos imágenes de la supuesta princesa, en las que se recalca que en la primera aparece sin afeitar y en la segunda «recién afeitada».

El post busca sorprender sobre los cambios en los cánones de belleza dependiendo de la época y la cultura pese a que la información sea errónea, ya que la foto no pertenece a la persona de la que se habla en el post. Anis-Al Doleh era una de las mujeres favoritas del sah de Persia Nasereddin de la dinastía Qajar y la persona que aparece en ambas fotos.

Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh, la verdadera princesa iraní.

Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh (1883-1936), en cambio, fue hija del rey persa y descenciente de la dinastía Qajar, familia que instauró su poder en el actual Irán desde 1794 hasta 1925. Tadj es-Saltaneh fue uno de los miembros más destacados de la dinastía por su independencia y su aportación a los cambios que sufrió el país a principios del siglo XX.

Separada y con cuatro hijos, se convirtió en musa del poeta Aref Qazvini y acabaría escribiendo su propia obra sobre los cambios acontecidos en Irán. Símbolo feminista de la época, apostaría por una indumentaria occidental y en la primera década del siglo XX fomentaría la igualdad entre hombres y mujeres. De lo que nada se sabe es de sus posteriores pretendientes y de si muchos de ellos acabarían suicidados por su rechazo.

Los cánones de belleza en Persia

La confusión de la imagen viral viene por mezclar a una de las esposas de Nasereddin con su hija en una historia que ya han visto miles de usuarios de Facebook desde hace meses y que en la última semana ha cobrado especial fuerza. Pese a todo, los cánones de belleza que en el Irán de finales del siglo XIX y principios del XX se manejaban eran muy distintos a los de la actualidad.

Una de las mujeres del harén del sha Nasereddin.

Gracias al propio Sah Nasereddin y a su pasión por la fotografía se pudo conocer que en aquella época y lugar se consideraban muestras de belleza las mujeres cejijuntas y hasta con bigote, tal y como mostraban la gran cantidad de fotografías que tomó el sha de las mujeres que convivían en su harén.

Princesa Qajair: la mujer iraní símbolo de belleza y perfección que causa furor en redes

Las fotos de esta mujer se han esparcido como pólvora, no hay red social donde no esté presente. Con la descripción “símbolo de belleza y perfección femenina”, a muchos les cuesta creer que esta mujer robusta, de cejas gruesas, bigote delicado y mirada penetrante tuvo 145 pretendientes, y 13 de ellos se suicidaron cuando fueron rechazados. Esta es la impactante historia de la Princesa iraní Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh.

MIRA ESTO: 10 ESCALOFRIANTES FOTOS DE PRISIONEROS EN JAPÓN DURANTE LA SEGUNDA GUERRA MUNDIAL, ERAN PIEL Y HUESO

Según informa el portal chileno Upsocl, las fotos pertenecen a la Princesa persa Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh, una mujer de la dinastía iraní Qajair (o Kayar, según diversas traducciones). Esta familia, que tenía raíces turcas, estuvo en el poder desde 1785 hasta 1925, cuando fueron derrocados por la dinastía Pahlaví.

TIENES QUE VER ESTO: 10 TERRIBLES EXPERIMENTOS NAZIS APLICADOS EN HUMANOS DURANTE EL HOLOCAUSTO (FOTOS)

Las leyendas sobre cómo los hombres se ‘morían’ (literal) por ella, quizá sean solo eso, leyendas, pues no hay registro de estos hechos, pero la Princesa Qajair fue real, y hay detalles muy interesantes sobre su vida que merecen ser compartidos.

Este es el post que se hizo viral, pero tiene algunos errores

La Princesa estuvo casada con Amir Hussein Khan Shoja’al Saltaneh, juntos tuvieron cuatro hijas. Las herederas eran consideradas más mujeres más bellas del país, pues compartían los mismos rasgos de su madre. Tiempo después, esta ‘perfecta familia’ tuvo que separarse, algo muy extraño en aquella época. Pero Zahra decidió divorciarse por una diferencia de intereses con su esposo.

Zahra era pintora, escritora, y una defensora de los derechos de las mujeres. Ella fue una de las primeras en usar ropa occidental en Irán. Esta visión revolucionaria la convirtió en musa inspiradora del poeta Aref Qazvini.

Podríamos decir que Zahra fue una mujer adelantada a su tiempo, una defensora de la igualdad de los derechos entre hombres y mujeres. Su nombre es motivo de estudio por su aportación a los cambios que sufrió el país a principios del siglo XX.

¿Interesante verdad? No olvides compartir para aclarar la verdad de este viral

Fuente: Upsocl

Pese a que muchos creen que es un cuento ficticio, acá te demostramos que no es una leyenda urbana

Publicado por Aweita en Domingo, 30 de julio de 2017

Princesa Qajair: la mujer iraní símbolo de belleza y perfección

Las fotos pertenecen a la Princesa persa Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh, una mujer de la dinastía iraní Qajair (o Kayar, según diversas traducciones).

La familia, que tenía raíces turcas, estuvo en el poder desde 1785 hasta 1925, cuando fueron derrocados por la dinastía Pahlaví.

Las leyendas sobre cómo los hombres se ‘morían’ (literal) por ella, quizá sean solo eso, leyendas, pues no hay registro de estos hechos, pero la Princesa Qajair fue real, y hay detalles muy interesantes sobre su vida que merecen ser compartidos.

La Princesa estuvo casada con Amir Hussein Khan Shoja’al Saltaneh, juntos tuvieron cuatro hijas. Las herederas eran consideradas más mujeres más bellas del país, pues compartían los mismos rasgos de su madre. Tiempo después, esta ‘perfecta familia’ tuvo que separarse, algo muy extraño en aquella época. Pero Zahra decidió divorciarse por una diferencia de intereses con su esposo.

Zahra era pintora, escritora, y una defensora de los derechos de las mujeres. Ella fue una de las primeras en usar ropa occidental en Irán. Esta visión revolucionaria la convirtió en musa inspiradora del poeta Aref Qazvini.

Podríamos decir que Zahra fue una mujer adelantada a su tiempo, una defensora de la igualdad de los derechos entre hombres y mujeres. Su nombre es motivo de estudio por su aportación a los cambios que sufrió el país a principios del siglo XX.

Fuente: Nosotras.

¿Realmente fue un símbolo de belleza y perfección? ¡Descúbrelo!

Recientemente se ha viralizado una imagen en las redes sociales de una ?peculiar? princesa de raro aspecto por no afeitarse y tener sobrepeso, pero que según se ha explicado destacaba por su ?belleza y perfección?. Se cuenta que se trata de la princesa iraní Qajair, quien por romper con los cánones de belleza, había rechazado a 145 pretendientes y que, inclusive, 13 de ellos se habían suicidado por haber sufrido su desprecio.

Sin embargo, la verdadera historia de esta princesa está un poco alejada de lo que se relata en Facebook. La princesa fue descendiente de la dinastia Qajair -familia real iraní de origen turco que estuvo en el poder desde 1785 hasta 1925- y su verdadero nombre es Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh.

Aunque no se sabe con precisión si todo lo que se ha dicho de ella es cierto, lo que sí es que era una mujer distinta al resto. Estuvo casada, tuvo 4 hijos y se divorció, cuestión que era muy mal visto en aquella época.

También destacó como una persona que luchaba por los derechos de las mujeres, lo que la coronó como una feminista para la época. Además, era pintora, escritora y una de las primeras mujeres en usar ropa occidental en Irán.

La princesa Qajar: la historia real de una princesa que conquistó mil corazones

Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh, una famosa princesa de origen iraní, fue considerada en su tiempo todo un ejemplo y símbolo “de belleza y perfección”. En efecto, no solo tuvo nada más y nada menos que 145 pretendientes, pertenecientes a la nobleza del reino, sino que además 13 de ellos decidieron quitarse la vida tras ser rechazados por ella.

Las redes sociales son un poderoso instrumento de difusión de noticias y de historias; en los últimos tiempos, las fotografías de esta princesa se han viralizado, siendo difundidas por toda la red y vistas por miles de usuarios.

Estas fotos han generado una gran controversia, abriendo un interesante debate, ya que a miles de personas les ha parecido graciosa la relación entre esta mujer y lo que actualmente se considera un ejemplo de belleza y perfección. Muchos de ellos en efecto la han denominado ¨la mujer más fea de la historia¨, dejando en claro cuanto pesan nuestros perjuicios y preconceptos sobre la belleza a la hora de juzgar una persona.

Sin embargo, tenemos que aclarar que es muy difícil corroborar la veracidad de estas fotografías, es decir, que sea efectivamente Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh la princesa que aparece en estas imágenes.

De todos modos, su historia es intrigante: descubramos juntos la historia de esta mujer revolucionaria que intriga a miles de usuarios de las redes sociales por todo el mundo!

1) Su vida

Su historia de vida es apasionante, no solo por su gran cantidad de pretendientes o por si puede ser considerada o no un símbolo de perfección y belleza, sino sobre todo porque pertenecía a la poderosa dinastía Qajar, de origen turco. La historia nos cuenta que esta misma dinastía fue derrocada por la familia Pahlaví.

Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh se casó con Amir Hussein Khan Shoja’al Saltaneh. De este matrimonio nacieron cuatro hijos. Parecidas físicamente a su madre, ya que habían heredado sus rasgos y aspecto, las hijas fueron consideradas también en su época como las mujeres más bellas del reino.

2) Su divorcio

Este matrimonio no fue eterno: en modo nada habitual para la época, ya que era inaceptable para la cultura y religión del pueblo iraní, estos príncipes se divorciaron. Se dice que el motivo principal de la ruptura fue una diferencia fundamental entre los cónyugues, aunque nunca se supo el motivo real, lo que si sabemos es que debe haber sido una situación muy polémica en su tiempo.

3) Su relación con el arte

Esta princesa, Zahra Khanom Tadj es-Saltaneh,fue admirada por numerosos artistas y poetas de la época, convirtiéndose en la musa de muchos de ellos. En efecto, sabemos que fue la musa inspiradora del renombrado poeta iraní Aref Qazvini, quien escribió en su honor y dedicó también la famosa poesía “Ey Taj”.

Además, podemos decir que ella misma era una artista: Zahra era también pintora y escritora.

4) Una princesa“feminista”

A lo largo de su vida Zahra luchó ferviente e incansablemente por los derechos de las mujeres. Fue una mujer tan revolucionaria que fue considerada por muchos como una“feminista”. En efecto, fue una de las primeras mujeres iraníes en usar ropa occidental en su país y en quitarse el hujab en la corte, generando no pocos escándalos.

Además de ser escritora y pintora, ella misma era una intelectual y activista. En su casa, una vez por semana, abría las puertas a otros artistas e intelectuales, realizando salones literarios.

Fue también la fundadora de la sociedad de la Libertad de la mujer en Irán, abriendo los horizontes de no pocas mujeres.

5) Su legado

Según la documentación histórica, Zahra habría muerto en el año 1936 y su cuerpo descansaría en el cementerio de Tajrish , Zahir od-Dowleh. Sin embargo no se conocen las causas de su deceso.

Su legado es fuerte, tanto como intelectual, activista y defensora de los derechos de la mujer, cuanto por romper con todos los estereotipos de belleza actuales y occidentales. ¿Leyenda o realidad?

En cualquier caso, hoy en día sus fotografías y su historia suscitan grandes pasiones e interrogantes: su figura se ha convertido en una imagen central en la redefinición de los estereotipos de perfección y belleza entre los usuarios de las redes sociales.

La princesa Qajar

Si este artículo te pareció interesante, ¡compártelo con tus amigos en Facebook!

admin

Deja un comentario

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *